Why Calcium is an important nutrient for our body ? - letsdiskuss
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@letsuser | Posted on | Health-beauty


Why Calcium is an important nutrient for our body ?


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@letsuser | Posted on


Some people don't known about Calcium is the one nutrient that comes to mind when most people think of preventing osteoporosis, a loss of ***** mass that often increases with age and can lead to fractures. Calcium is an important nutrient for building ***** and for slowing the pace of ***** loss that comes with age. But it’s not the single magic bullet for preventing osteoporosis, and some scientists suggest that too much calcium or dairy products may be unhealthy. Keep in mind that there are other nutrients and foods that help keep your bones strong — most importantly vitamin D, but also vitamin K, fluoride, and possibly fish.
The dietary reference intakes (DRI) for calcium is 1,000 mg a day for adults up to age 50 and 1,200 mg a day for people over 50, when ***** loss accelerates. With age, the intestines absorb less metallic element from the diet and also the kidneys appear to be less economical at protective metallic element. As a result, your body uses more of the calcium stored in your bones for a variety of important metabolic functions.
Scientific studies have yielded completely different results concerning what quantity metallic element you actually want for preventing age-related ***** loss.
For example, a report in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2003 found that calcium intake during youth pays dividends many decades later. In this study of 3,215 women, those women over age 50 who, as children, drank very little milk (less than one serving a week) were twice as possible to fracture a hip as girls World Health Organization had consumed quite one serving daily. however metallic element intake throughout adulthood might not have constant profit.

Seven studies done in the United States and Europe that have followed thousands of people for many years have found no correlation between a high intake of calcium in adulthood and fewer ***** fractures. For example, in the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, people who drank two or more glasses of milk a day were no less likely to break a hip or forearm as people who drank one glass or less a week.
Men should be aware that some preliminary findings suggest that high calcium intake from milk may increase the risk of prostate cancer. For women, studies have suggested a possible link between calcium from milk and increased risk of ovarian cancer. In both cases, the risk came from milk specifically, so even if research confirms the danger, it’s not clear whether the culprit is calcium or something else about milk.
Other foods and nutrients will facilitate guard against pathology. In building *****, metallic element has an important assistant: Vitamin D. This nutrition helps the body absorb metallic element, and a few researchers suppose that increasing Vitamin D will facilitate forestall pathology. however many of us don’t get enough Vitamin D.
A study of people admitted to Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston found that more than half had a deficiency. This problem is most common among people who live in northern regions of the country, because they don’t spend much time in the sun. Exposure to daylight prompts the skin to manufacture vitamin D. If you don’t make enough vitamin D yourself, you can also get it from milk and other dairy products, fortified breakfast cereals, eggs, and vitamin supplements.
Other substances may help fight osteoporosis. The Nurses’ Health Study found that women who got more than 109 mcg of vitamin K a day were 30 percent less likely to break a hip than women who got less. To get enough vitamin K, eat one or more servings daily of dark green lettuce, broccoli, spinach, brussels sprouts, or kale. Vitamin K helps regulate calcium and build *****. Additionally, some studies show that isoflavones in soy can slow ***** loss and therefore might help prevent osteoporosis.
Fluoride is another substance that may play a role in building *****. Fluoride has been tested in many experiments over the last few decades with contradictory results. While some studies have shown that fluoride builds *****, several trials in the 1980s indicated that taking fluoride supplements did not reduce spinal fractures. But more recent research has shown that a newer slow-release version increases ***** density and reduces spinal fractures. Fluoride therapy is used in several countries to treat osteoporosis, and the FDA is considering its use here. Whether the fluoride normally added to public drinking water reduces ***** fractures remains a controversial question.
A word of caution: Don’t take halide supplements on your own. Taking an excessive amount of halide will really be unhealthy for your bones by creating them brittle.The amounts of fluoride added to drinking water are safe.


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@letsuser | Posted on


The health and strength of our bones rely on a balanced diet and a steady stream of nutrients, most importantly, calcium and Vitamin D. Calcium is a mineral that people need to build and maintain strong bones and teeth. ... Calcium is not made in the body — it must be absorbed from the foods we eat.


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