Why is TIG welding a constant current welding operation and MIG welding is a constant voltage welding operation? - Letsdiskuss
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Anonymous

Posted 19 Jan, 2020 |

Why is TIG welding a constant current welding operation and MIG welding is a constant voltage welding operation?

lets user

blogger | Posted 19 Jan, 2020

TIG or GTAW works comparatively to SMAW or sticks welding, then again it utilizes a non-consumable cathode, the tungsten. My current or amperage setting will decide what number of electrons are moving over the bend for a given time, yet as  the voltage will change as light draws nearer or further away from the work. (Truly, I realize the amperage does as well, yet to keep things basic for the clarification, how about we envision the current is totally steady). At the point when stick or TIG welding, when no bend is struck there is OCV (open circuit voltage) that is higher to help set up the circular segment, around 70 volts. When you build up a circular segment it can drop and change somewhere in the range of 13 and 20 volts, plus or minus. 


At the point when you're MIG wire or GMAW welding, the welding machine works in an unexpected way. Your current is controlled by the speed of the wire leaving the light head every moment. In the event that I am welding in a straight line and my light draws nearer and further away from the work, my amperage is hypothetically changing, while my voltage continues as before. I set my voltage to adjust the circular segment or electrical weight, this encourages me to change how the metal is stored on the workpiece. I can control the voltage to accomplish the strategy for metal exchange which stays steady while I weld.